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Hazelnut Notes is a blog site and a resource for information on the topics of contemplative activism, postmodern religion, and public theology. These topics are accessible via the links in the menu above.

Blog topics include individual spirituality, religious practice, Christianity, and the nexus of religion, science, and social science, public theology. Specific blog categories are available here:

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  • Corporate Institutional Worship is a Means to an End, Not the End Itself
    In Anglican Spirituality (ed. William Wolf), Harvey Guthrie gives an overview of some of the principal contours of what he understands Anglican spirituality to be. Anglicanism tends not to emphasize confessional (prizing correct belief) or experiential (prizing interior conversion experiences) frameworks so much as pragmatic (prizing corporate participation). As such, Guthrie argues that Anglican spirituality
  • NOTES FROM NIGHT 2 OF THE 2021 PARENTING FORWARD CONFERENCE: “PARENTING AFTER PURITY CULTURE”
    This year’s Parenting Forward conference has the theme of “Parenting After Purity Culture,” with speakers sharing advice and perspectives about teaching kids about sex, but from a non-fundamentalist perspective (either religious or secular). The conference presumes that most attendees were raised in conservative religious communities with traditional sexual norms and values. What follows is a paraphrase of
  • Notes from Night 1 of the 2021 Parenting Forward Conference: “Parenting After Purity Culture”
    This year’s Parenting Forward conference has the theme of “Parenting After Purity Culture,” with speakers sharing advice and perspectives about teaching kids about sex, but from a non-fundamentalist perspective (either religious or secular). The conference presumes that most attendees were raised in conservative religious communities with traditional sexual norms and values. What follows is a
  • N.T. Wright’s Take on Christian Ethics and Values
    What is the right thing to do? What is the appropriate Christian response to difficult moral dilemmas, interpersonal interactions, personal behavior, and societal injustices? These are important questions to me, in part, because of the strong polarization in contemporary American Christianity. The reality is that the vast majority of American denominations have sorted themselves into
  • Using our Freedom Wisely: Paul on Eating Idol Meat and Giving Up our Wants for the Sake of Others
    “Paul asks, “what’s more important? Exercising your freedom to do whatever you want, or to be sensitive to your friends and family who maybe don’t see the world the same as you? Can we instead meet them where they are so that we can help them grow and come closer to God and each other?”